Ad Gets Learning Curve Claim Screwed Up

solidworks_curve.jpg

While we assume SolidWorks meant the learning curve for its 3D CAD software is a quick up and down, visually, this ad implies the curve is, as an astute Adrants reader noted, a brick wall.

by Steve Hall    Jan-19-06   Click to Comment   
Topic: Online   

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Comments



Comments

I think a horizontal line... a "curve" so shallow you don't actually need to learn anything to use our product... would have given their point the visual they intended. This doesn't just have a "brick wall" feel, but learning curves that are "steep" are "bad" or "hard" and what's steeper than the sheer face of a cliff?

Posted by: Steve on January 19, 2006 4:49 PM

Engineers and designers (the target market for SolidWorks, which is an engineering software company) should know that a learning curve is graphed where the x axis is time and the y axis is the amount of learning or knowledge. What a vertical or near vertical line shows is that a large amount of learning takes place in a very short amount of time. This is only possible if the product is easy to use. If a product is not easy to use, it takes you a lot longer to accumulate a given amount of knowledge, and therefore the line would have a flatter slope showing that in the same amount of time or effort you learn a lot less.

If I were an engineer, I would want to use the product where I was able to learn as much as possible about it as quickly as possible.

Posted by: Mike on January 23, 2007 4:14 PM

dy/dx = infinite
Soliworks is correct.
No Learning just a brick wall
6 steps fwd then 8 back
Regards
Steve

Posted by: dirtyonSolidworks on February 5, 2007 5:59 AM

dy/dx = infinite
Solidworks is correct.
No Learning just a brick wall
6 steps fwd then 8 back
Regards
Steve

Posted by: dirtyonSolidworks on February 5, 2007 5:59 AM





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