Apple Intel Ad Could Have Been Saved With Copy Change

apple_intel_ad.jpg

Putting aside the swirling controversy over Apple's copy The Postal Service's video for its new Intel ad, Apple matters dissects the ad and explains why it is so offensive to current Mac users, current windows user and just about everyone else. Not one to just complain with out offering a solution, App;le Matters suggests the whole problem could have been avoided had the copy writer simply written, "Starting today the Intel chip will get to power the most advanced operating system on earth: OS X< rather than the everyone sucks copy, "The Intel Chip. For years, it's been trapped inside PCs, inside dull little boxes dutifully performing dull little tasks when it could have been doing so much more. Starting today, the Intel chip will be set free and get to live inside a Mac. Imagine the possibilities." Think about it. Apple really did trash most everyone with this new ad. A new chip inside an Apple is hardly going to affect sales. A bad commercial like this one will. Negatively.

by Steve Hall    Jan-26-06   Click to Comment   
Topic: Commercials, Opinion   

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Comments



Comments

Great article. The author's line of thinking reminds me a lot of a recent JC Penney campaign, in which outrageously misbehaving children are confronted by their clueless father who drolly comments: "Where is your mother?" (Turns out each respective mom is SHOPPING at JC PENNEY!)

That campaign just shat upon all prospective customers-who-just-happened-to-be-parents: dads are invariably incompetent (and chauvinistic!) boobs who cannot be trusted with the welfare of their own children, lest things run entirely amok; moms are loopy, materialistic nincompoops who slavishly dash off to sales in such a flit that they forget to tell their husbands where they're going and that he needs to put a modicum of effort into watching the kids. Oh and speaking of your kids: THEY'RE FUCKING MONSTERS.

Posted by: Ben on January 26, 2006 1:58 PM

how is this offensive to Mac users? i hate to miss an opportunity to take offense.

Posted by: ccm on January 26, 2006 2:27 PM

i have won many esteemed awards while you have yet to win your first battle of the ad blogs award. you can crit me when you have a clio. or a mobius. or something. now where is my bong??????

Posted by: lee clown on January 26, 2006 3:00 PM

uh, holy non-story batman.

according to reports, apple has not been able to keep up with demand for the new powerbooks.

core studies show that the average mac user is hugely disdainful of intel, hugely disdainful of pc's, windows, etc. they know this. so they play to these people, as the loss of the loyal mac fan is much worse than pissing off the few IT dorks who hate apple with every shred of their body only because they can't use them.

they also have a TON in the bank with the halo effect from the ipod.

the ad is hardly anything new, but neither was the postal service's hugely derivative ad, taking place in an environment that is, surprise, pretty much true to a clean room environment.

both you and the p.s. are whining a bit too much and need to back it up with much more than opinion.

Posted by: dave on January 26, 2006 3:46 PM

uh, holy non-story batman.

according to reports, apple has not been able to keep up with demand for the new powerbooks.

core studies show that the average mac user is hugely disdainful of intel, hugely disdainful of pc's, windows, etc. they know this. so they play to these people, as the loss of the loyal mac fan is much worse than pissing off the few IT dorks who hate apple with every shred of their body only because they can't use them.

they also have a TON in the bank with the halo effect from the ipod.

the ad is hardly anything new, but neither was the postal service's hugely derivative video, taking place in an environment that is, surprise, pretty much true to a clean room environment.

both you and the p.s. are whining a bit too much and need to back it up with much more than opinion.

Posted by: dave on January 26, 2006 3:47 PM

I am a Mac user. I now feel empowered. I soon will be free.

The tragedy is not in the copy, rather the content. But then again, I'm sure the United Postal Service got all pissy when The Postal Service appropriated their name.


Let's discuss a more important issue: MAC vs PC. Itís bad and getting worse.

Just check out all of the emerging technology.

A video is a video as much as an mp3 is an mp3.

Why should the platform matter? It does matter.

Just like the color of your skin used to matter.

. . . Get what Iím saying?

Posted by: diannone on January 26, 2006 6:20 PM

apple has had a long history of bashing pc's. They did an add making fun of the fact that windows copied their trash can idea.

And for what it's worth, pc's still own 96% of the market share, so what difference does it make if a 4% minority calls its 96% counterpoint boring?

I use a mac, i love using mac's but my whole life up until these past two years i have used pc's. I think anyone who uses a pc will attest that they aren't boring compared to mac's but let them have their fun. :)

Posted by: andy on January 26, 2006 10:05 PM

Stumbled across this today while doing a search. I was responsible for the outbound marketing launch for the Intel Macs so I'm a little biased here... That said, the Intel switch and the effort behind it raised domestic Mac share from less than 3% to about 8%. Looks like you really blew your prognostication in this post! Seems to me like emotion got in the way of the macro-level analysis.

Posted by: Brett Murray on November 23, 2007 12:52 PM

Stumbled across this today while doing a search. I was responsible for the outbound marketing launch for the Intel Macs so I'm a little biased here... That said, the Intel switch and the effort behind it raised domestic Mac share from less than 3% to about 8%. Looks like you really blew your prognostication in this post! Seems to me like emotion got in the way of the macro-level analysis.

Posted by: Brett Murray on November 23, 2007 12:54 PM







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