Where is the Line When it Comes to Sexualized Imagery?

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Over at I Mean...What?!? Abe Gurko makes an insightful observation into the hypocrisy which, seemingly, runs wild in today's society. Gurko argues, "You cannot walk around trashing Miley Cyrus for doing a lap dance with an old queen like Adam Shankman and consider the new Miss USA marketing campaign a good idea."

Of the campaign, Gurko writes, "all 51 contestants have traded in their pageant hair and cornball, prom gowns for that skanky, Gross Baboon of the Year look that all of Tiger Woods' skanks share."

Furthering his point, Gurko adds, "You cannot watch Jersey Shore and think it is hilarious, anxiously waiting Season Two, then judge Miley Cyrus for being too young to be sexy."

Oh course, Miley was 16 at the time of her lap dance and the cast of Jersey Shore are well over the age of 18 but the point is a valid one in a broader sense. We love to use and see sexualized imagery in advertising and the broader media but God forbid if it's one's son or daughter being sexualized.

And if you want to get really creepy, all you have to do is look at what's going on over at Disney with Selena Gomez's latest release, Trust in Me, an album aimed at pre-teens.

Or the practice of marketing bras to pre-teen girls?

In 2005, we wrote, "From Bratz Dolls to padded bras to Ashlee Simpson to sex bracelets, tween girls are being taught, at a very early age, that sex appeal is very powerful. Explaining the reason she buys sexy clothes, twelve year old Amanda says, like it's a good thing, 'You get more attention. And strange guys come up to you and try and get you to go to nightclubs.'"

So...where is the line when it comes to sexualized imagery?

by Steve Hall    May-12-10   Click to Comment   
Topic: Celebrity, Opinion, Trends and Culture   

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