Why 'Exposure Rate' Will Improve Your Facebook Marketing


If you haven't been sleeping under a rock then you know social media has quickly become one of the preferred methods for brands to interact with consumers. When done right, social media can foster meaningful relationships between brands and consumers that never could have existed before.

A new report from Kenshoo, part of the Adrants white paper series, is the first of several from digital marketing shop Resolution Media and Kenshoo Social. The report looks at global trends in social media, with a specific focus on Facebook Marketplace ads, and offers actionable insights and metrics for brand advertisers. The report introduces Exposure Rate, a new metric that gives more meaning to reach.

Download the report now and learn how you can amp up your Facebook marketing.

by Steve Hall    Aug- 6-12    
Topic: Research, Social

Levi's Helps Millennials Take Over the World


Writing in More About Advertising, Stephen Foster says Levi's has "lightened up" with a follow up to the Wieden + Kennedy-created opus, Go Forth Braddock. That spot, if you recall, pulled the heartstrings by focusing on American despair and how that despair, so says the commercial, motivates people to work towards a goal. Idealistic is an understatement.

The agency's new work, This is a Pair of Levi's, is far from a "lightening up" of the original. In fact, it pours on the hipsterific poetics as if the entire world suddenly and collectively participated in a gigantic hand-waving, come-to-Jesus beatnik meeting of epic proportion.

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by Steve Hall    Aug- 6-12    
Topic: Brands, Campaigns, Creative Commentary

Jason Priestly, Gabrielle Carteris Teach For Old Navy


Crispin Porter + Bogusky is out with another 90's flashback for Old Navy. Having capitalized on Mayim Balik and Joey Lawrence, the agency has turned to the original 90210 alums Jason Priestly and Gabrielle Carteris for its latest outing. The spot is as quirky as ever with Priestly and Carteris posing as teachers in a color-fueled, robotically-enhanced school whre a "new girl" makes her debut.

Hey we like the spot but all these "retro" commercial do is make us feel old.

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by Steve Hall    Aug- 6-12    
Topic: Commercials

Eulogy For A Copywriter


Over the weekend I was informed by AdScam's George Parker that his friend and long time copywriter Curvin O'Reilly had passed away after a short bout with cancer. Who was Curvin O'Reilly? I didn't know the man but George did so please read what he had to say about this man who, it appears, embodied the reality of our current day fantasies of the Mad Men era.

In addition to George's thoughtful words, Tom Messner wrote a beautiful eulogy he shared with a few of us over the weekend.

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by Steve Hall    Aug- 6-12    
Topic: Agencies

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Shuttlecocks + Controversy = Happy Advertisers


This Olympics-focused editorial series is written by Ronald Urbach, Chairman of law firm Davis & Gilbert LLP and the co-chair of the Advertising, Marketing & Promotions Practice Group at the firm.

I don't know about you, but the last time I played badminton was when I was on summer vacation with my kids. We bought the kit at the local hardware store, set it up on the grass and started playing. As we played, not only did we have fun, we got better. This stimulated me to learn a little more about the game: the little birdie thing that we were hitting was called a shuttlecock, and the game itself had been started by bored British military officers in 18th century India.

What does my summer vacation game have to do with the Olympics, advertisers, and agencies? Well, thanks to the South Korean, Indonesian, and Chinese Olympic badminton teams, I now know that badminton is an Olympic sport and has been since 1992. Eight Olympic badminton players from these countries threw their games - in other words, they intentionally tried to lose. Was this a Black Sox Scandal? No. No one was bribed and no one was betting on the matches hoping to personally profit from their actions. What happened was they wanted to lose so that they would face an easier opponent in the later rounds of the competition. Call it strategic losing. Go to YouTube and watch one of the matches - the entire stadium audience recognized what was happening and boos rained down on the athletes. It was bizarre.

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by Steve Hall    Aug- 6-12    
Topic: Opinion

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