Milk Makes Pretty Game, Tests Willingness to Wait, We Fail

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A tip-off from Frederik Samuel: Goodby, Silverstein and Partners put together this visually lush site for Milk called Get the Glass.

We love the attention to detail and the character mix but by the time we got to the game (which we looked forward to playing until the countdown lag) we were antsy out of our minds.

Did you guys have to start the preloading countdown at, like, 80? What were you thinking? Once it got to 55 and we realized you were serious, we had already decided we would build our own toy wonderland in the duration and torch it out of vengeance.

by Angela Natividad    Mar-16-07    




Senior Eye Ad Sparks Outrageously Juvenile Compulsion

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We're minding our own business, reading an article on reverse mortgages for a fear-induced high, when we see this ad for Jeffrey D Horn, MD, vision specialist.

And now we feel this insane compulsion to don a white coat, walk down the street and bark "Cataracts slowing you down? GET YOUR ZOOM BACK!" at innocent spectacled passersby. If we didn't have titanic strength of will we most undoubtedly would, unbridled and uncut.

Sometimes your message just doesn't interpret the way it ought to. But maybe it's not the ad. Maybe we should just stop trolling senior citizen websites. Maybe we should stop mixing vodka in our orange juice at breakfastime. There could be a thousand contributing factors here.

by Angela Natividad    Mar-16-07    
Topic: Online, Strange



W. Virginia Psychs Out Would-Be Tourists with 'Why Bother?' Approach

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AdFreak educates us
on an eyebrow-raising repositioning campaign for West Virginia. Their last tourism stint, the "desperate housewives" upper middle class ennui card, apparently yielded mediocre results because they've thrown their heirloom-encrusted hands in the air with the new "Whatever you do, don't come to West Virginia!" campaign. (And we're not quipping. That's actually the tagline.)

"There's value in the copy," says travel/marketing director Liz Chewning of WV's tourism division. "You choose the words carefully and try to surprise your reader, hooking them by saying the unexpected."

more »

by Angela Natividad    Mar-16-07    
Topic: Campaigns, Online



Nike Revives Rakim with Force Montage

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Nike is less shoe purveyor than societal tastemaker. With symphonic float like a butterfly, sting like a bee undercurrents, their marketing work consistently defines our image of victory and strength-oriented aesthetics. They even turn breathing into athletic art.

Nike's especially good at throwbacks and mash-ups. We're old-school Rakim fans so we're pretty taken with this web-only spot for Nike Force, entitled Force Heritage.

The lovechild of R/GA and Stardust Studios, the spot showcases 25 years of Nike Force ad history with a Rakim-laced custom track from creative director Alex Moulton and composer Mike "G:Neu" Genato of Expansion Team.

It takes a special kind of touch to make Air Forces appealing; we were never fans of the shoe. But it has lent itself to a lot of evolution and playful cultural design. We kind of wish the spot played more with that than with the usual sweaty basketball player mishmash.

Nonetheless, the spot's delicious. Look at us, look at us, we're gushing like head-bopping break-dancing groupies back in grade school. We'd act on the feeling except at this point in our lives we'd probably break our tailbones. Better to just bob.

by Angela Natividad    Mar-16-07    
Topic: Brands, Good, Online



Greek Station Puts Lyrical Love in Dictators' Mouths

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To put past petty tiffs in proper perspective, Greek station Galaxy 92 put together a set of print ads called "DOGMA" with help from Lowe out of Athens. Each features a country-traumatizing dictator bearing features of a beloved pop icon, coupled with music-related manifestos rich in iron-fist conviction.

Be-fro'ed Hitler at left soberly states "Black people are the future of music," while Mao Tse-Tung spouts, "Hard rock is the real cultural revolution." Stalin, of course, says "I bless America for rock n' roll."

It would be nice if cultural and political differences could be solved with music. We could all have smoked pot and fileshared, thereby potentially saving a lot of lives, ammunition and time. Thanks to Creative Criminal for bringing the campaign to our attention.

by Angela Natividad    Mar-16-07    
Topic: Good, Magazine, Online



Hillary Goes Viral, Obama Still Has More Friends

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If you've ever harbored a politician payola fantasy or simply wanted your vote to count, Hillary Clinton gives you the Count Every Vote Act, her (hopefully) viral attempt to turn every American into a foot-stomping, vote-seizing "citizen co-sponsor" - not for her campaign but for the right to vote itself. (And don't forget to send to a friend.)

Well, it doesn't take a marketing douche to say it's always nice to have the addresses of several thousand online supporters on file and at the ready for a slew of e-mail blasts pre-2008. ZDNet notes, "The Clinton 'I need you to be my legislative co-sponsor' exhortation recalls the Web 2.0 cliche 'users are in control.'"

more »

by Angela Natividad    Mar-16-07    
Topic: Campaigns, Good, Online, Social



Wrigley Starts Solstice Sweepstakes, Makes Good on Digg

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In its ongoing effort to deluge us with distractions, Wrigley's Candystand pulls yet another promotion out of its candy ... self.

After a brief registration process you, yes you, can take part in a sweepstakes for a Pontiac Solstice. The Wrigley/GM contest is heavily branded with information on the Big E Pack, which contains an inordinate illogical amount of Eclipse gum (over 60 pieces!!!). Its unique packaging and the way it's hocked on the short sweepstakes introduction ("Keep one on the counter ... in a desk...") brings baby wipes to mind.

While we're here we might as well tell you about Candystand's sequel to Flash Element TD, lamely titled Flash Circle TD.

David Scott of the original Flash Element assisted in creating the Wrigley-fied remix. It's doing nicely on Digg, whose community doesn't seem to mind that the game is swathed in LifeSavers ads. It did spark an interesting conversation on idea-ripping though.

Who'd have guessed candy would mesh well with cars or even consoles, for that matter. What is the point of candy anyway?

by Angela Natividad    Mar-15-07    
Topic: Games, Online



SXSW: Tinker Toys For Technologists

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This week, SXSW Interactive featured a keynote conversation with Limor Fried (Adafruit Industries) and Phil Torrone (MAKE Magazine). Hacking the DIY culture, Torrone and Fried discussed the techniques of tinkering with technology. With examples such as the Bacon Alarm Clock, skin-embedded RFID chips, and the recent Gummy Bear Chandelier, the panelists whetted the audience's palate with a selection of delicious DIY snacks.

Hacktivism culture has been spreading at a rapid rate as of late. Simply said, "People make weird and bizarre things," Torrone stated in response to the movement. Sharing "recipes" has now become commonplace among tinkering communities and unlike dating, you're not slapped if you show all your intimate parts too soon.

more »

by Ariel Waldman    Mar-14-07    
Topic: Industry Events, Online, Social



State Farm Tosses Bone at Cogs Working Through March Madness

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Just because you have a job doesn't mean you should miss out on the fun and games of March Madness. With the wilting white collar worker in mind, Tribal DDB throws together a March Madness tourney toolkit on behalf of State Farm.

It makes one feel pathetic in its all-encompassing office splendour. Users hungry for the rush can download March Madness propaganda, create a little bobble-headed friend and play office hoops.

That's almost like being at a March Madness game ... except not.

by Angela Natividad    Mar-14-07    
Topic: Games, Online



'Search Me' Ads Drive People to Web

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Rather than trying to get people to remember a company's URL which isn't always the easiest thing to remember, several companies in Japan have started using what have been referred to as "search me" ads. The ads offer the visual of a search bar with a search term already filled in. People are urged to perform the search, either immediately on their phone or later on their computer.

If the terms are chosen properly and th proper search engine marketing accompany the effort, the approach just may work. There's only so much a single ad can convey but an ad they points people to a place where endless information can be conveyed would appear to be an effective approach.

by Steve Hall    Mar-14-07    
Topic: Good, Online, Outdoor, Trends and Culture










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