Beer Fights: Not Just For Humans

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LAVA Communications, the company that recently created the Ban the Tongue Mocumentary, has seeded a humorous beer ad, created by Australia's BMF Advertising, for beer brewer Tooheys which eschews the traditional fights between humans over the great taste of beer and places the fight squarely where the action is: the refrigerator. And the vacuum cleaner. And the washing machine - which gets really pissed. And, the pool cleaner. Go figure. Watch it. It's different...which, in advertising, is a very good thing.

by Steve Hall    Sep- 6-05    
Topic: Commercials



Coke Relents, Spec Spot OK...With Disclaimer

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Following a post to the WhereSpot discussion group and a story here on Adrants, Coke has called off its lawyers, who had threatened photographer Paul Papanek with legal action over a couple of spec spots he had created, and said it's fine the spots remain in existence as long as Papanek disclaims them as unaffiliated with Coke. It all seems very logical. A creative is allowed to express himself. A brand gets additional exposure without spending a cent. Everyone's happy. Except the lawyers. After three threatening letters, Coke's legal army was, apparently, called off and sent back to the dungeon to dream up other methods of charging Coke a fortune just to type up a few simple letter.

Writing in the WheresSpot discussion group, Papanek gleefully reports Coke representative Ms. Perlstein told him "everyone at Coke is talking about it" and even the brand managers are checking the spots out. Oh, and the lawyers? They're not all bad. They contacted Papanek directly and had amicable conversations.

Next time, perhaps, Coke will realize the value of consumer created media and leave well enough alone. Or, at least, approach the situation with less legal stiffness. Unless of course the work harms the brand which, clearly, Papanek's work did not.

by Steve Hall    Sep- 6-05    
Topic: Brands, Commercials, Policy



Summer's Over, Advertising Hasn't Changed

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On this first day following the U.S. Labor Day holiday and to remind us all advertising hasn't changed one bit, we bring you this commercial from GameStop, featured in this week's Ad Age TV Spots of the Week, in which video game hotties come to life and battle the fantasizing psyche of male gamers. Creative strategy: brain-dead, video game-addled men. Hot, ass-kicking women. Done, shoot it. Let's do lunch.

In other new spots this week, HP brings back its Frame Up ads. Catholic Charities rivets with a simple but brilliantly well-executed call for donations. The Chinese government goes to elaborate lengths to get citizens to floss their teeth. Cadbury does its false teeth thing that we've seen before. Wendy's uses a tooth to sell a ranch burger. Kia trys to make its cars seem as important is winning some sort of important sporting event. And, yes, America Express helps Andy get his Mojo back.

by Steve Hall    Sep- 6-05    
Topic: Commercials



Kicking Hamster in Ad OK'd

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Finally, common sense has prevailed and humor may be reborn. Adland points to an ad for UK Powerleague which shows a woman playing with a hamster in a ball until her boyfriend comes in, does some soccer moves and boots the ball out the window with the hamster still inside was not banned by the UK's Advertising Standards Authority. While one complainant said the ad could encourage animal cruelty, the ASA said it was all done in fun and is clearly not condoning animal cruelty. Humor people. It's called humor.

by Steve Hall    Aug-31-05    
Topic: Commercials, Policy



Legalities of Brand Usage in Spec Spots Questioned

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Television commercial director and photographer Paul Papanek who, a few years ago, directed a couple of spec spots recently received several letters from Coke's in-house and out-of-house legal councils informing him he used Coke's logo without permission. His spots have been featured on his websites as well as on The Spec Spot and Boards Magazine. Each of the three letters Papanek received were increasingly threatening with the last one, dated August 15, informing him he must remove the spots from all the sites within 14 days or suffer nastier legal ramifications.

While Coke is well within their rights to protect their logo and brand, Papanek, writing in the WheresSpot Yahoo news group, wonders about the implications of Coke's request. Papanek cites the common practice of directors and production companies producing spec spots to promote their businesses, build their freelance careers or to pitch new business and wonders how this might affect spec creative. We wonder if new businesses pitches and creative reels will now be required to have logos digitized out. The two spots in question can be seen here and here. Papanek has commented and posted Coke's letters here.

by Steve Hall    Aug-30-05    
Topic: Brands, Commercials, Policy



Godzilla Has A Hummer

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In a new Modernista commercial for Hummer's H3, a rampaging, Godzilla-like creative tears through a city until she meets up with a robot-like creature. The two fall in love, Godzilla gets pregnant and pumps out a Hummer H3. Sweet. Other commercials in this week's Ad Age TV Spots of the Week include a long form commercial for Bon Jovi's new album, "Have A Nice Day," a Champ Sports/Adidas commercial that promotes the "flight control" of a sneaker with an in-sneaker pilot crew, Fat Joe becomes a pet psychologist for Boost Mobile, a Cadbury Schweppes commercial that portray Dr. Pepper as addictive as drugs, a NASCAR Nextel commercial that doesn't say much, Elmer's Glue "empowers creativity" similar to the way the current Windows campaign, humorously, "empowers" your life, an HP commercial that appears to glorify goofing off over paying attention in class and a Target commercial that, well, sells a lot of stuff Target-style.

by Steve Hall    Aug-29-05    
Topic: Commercials



Milwaukee Drill Powers Helicopter

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In this commercial which involves drills and helicopters, the power of the new cordless Milwaukee V28, lithium ion-powered drill is clearly and humorously displayed.

by Steve Hall    Aug-11-05    
Topic: Commercials



Very Pink Hotties Provide Football Fantasy

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We received these spots from a very kind and very knowledgeable public relations professional who knew we simply couldn't resist sharing them with you. The spots are part of a Wieden + Kennedy created campaign promoting ESPN's Fantasy Football. Leveraging every man's fantasy in which the perfect football team would be a bunch of hotties dressed in sexy pink outfits frolicking on a very pink bed in a very pink room, the spots certainly grab attention but not in a purely T&A fashion. You see, the models in the fantasy are in on the joke and know they are just pawns in the mind of a daydreaming football fan. Well done.

by Steve Hall    Aug-10-05    
Topic: Campaigns, Commercials, Television



Newsflash: Hardee's Launches Ad With No Sex

Perhaps taking a break from slathering the world with sexual imagery to promote meat, Hardee's/Carl's has decided to run an ad promoting milk shakes. How does one promote milk shakes? You shake a cow, of course. In this spot, a guy, well, shakes a cow. Not much else to say about it.

In other featured ads in this week's Ad Age TV Spots of the Week Cingular interrupts its own pre-movie commercial to implore people to silence their phones, historical figures traumatize a couple for the Library of Congress, a guy eats a Pringles can just to prove the chips taste better, a camera so thin it can be mailed demonstrates the beauty of the new Sony Cyber Shot, Audi does its missing A3 thing, kids dance for Converse and DC Shoes goes with James Lipton.

by Steve Hall    Aug- 8-05    
Topic: Commercials



United Church of Christ to Continue Controversial Campaign

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Stirring the pot again, the United Church of Christ, the church that, earlier this year, ran ads mocking other churches showing a bouncer who refused entry to minorities and gays is planning a new ad. The first ad, "Bouncer," part of the $3 million "God is Speaking" campaign, was refused by ABC, NBC and CBS. The church promises the second ad will be in the same vein as the "Bouncer" ad.

by Steve Hall    Aug- 8-05    
Topic: Campaigns, Commercials










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