That Slanty Eyed Asian Ad From Spain? Misinterpreted

spainad3.jpeg

Oops. In our hyper politically correct world, even gestures meant as a joke can be completely misunderstood and transformed into accusations of racism. The Spanish Olympic basketball team posed for an ad in which they used their hands to form what was supposed to be a wink to their participation in the Beijing Olympics but was interpreted as the not so polite slany-eyed Asian facial expression.

Interpret it as you see fit but we're a long way from becoming the fun-loving, all-loving planet which was on brief display during the Olympic opening ceremony.

by Steve Hall    Aug-13-08   Click to Comment   
Topic: Strange   

Enjoy what you've read? Subscribe to Adrants Daily and receive the daily contents of this site each day along with free whitepapers.



Comments



Comments

Huh, and we wonder why these things happen. Here's an official example proliferated byt the National Palace Museum of Taiwan putting that stereotype out there as a "mascot."
http://www.fitzsu.com/alessi-alessi-chin-family-c-255_383_1223.html

Posted by: pinsanneedles on August 13, 2008 3:18 PM

Huh, and we wonder why these things happen. Here's an official example proliferated by the National Palace Museum of Taiwan putting that stereotype out there as a "mascot."
http://www.fitzsu.com/alessi-alessi-chin-family-c-255_383_1223.html

Posted by: pinsanneedles on August 13, 2008 3:19 PM

some jokes are funny. this one isn't.

Posted by: 3 on August 13, 2008 4:20 PM

Since when do adults need to use their hands to wink? My guess: The photographer yelled, “Wink!” But the players heard, “Chink!”

Posted by: Charlie Chan on August 13, 2008 9:30 PM

Also, Steve, the opening ceremony was indeed a display.

Posted by: Charlie Chan on August 13, 2008 9:34 PM

pinsanneedles,

if you don’t understand the difference between what spain’s team did and the items you referenced, you should change your screen name to pinheadanneedles

Posted by: Charlie Chan on August 14, 2008 12:10 AM

But who exactly is offended?

The Organization of Chinese-Americans has released multiple statements condemning the picture. George Wu, deputy director of the group, said, "it is unfortunate that this type of imagery would rear its head during something that is supposed to be a time of world unity." Response in Beijing has been muted so far.

Chinese-Americans are offended, whereas in Beijing there's no evidence that anyone cares. This may be more a commentary on America's culture of ethnic grievance than anything else.

Posted by: deakley on August 14, 2008 4:34 AM

The fact that a lot of people in the stadiums booed the spanish team says a lot. So, yes. The chinese were offended, and they're really the only ones that matter.

Posted by: david on August 14, 2008 5:42 AM

I can recall several days and nights in Madrid where I was the recipient of this gesture with slurs from 'respectable-looking' people who were not smiling or in elementary school. How is this any different from other distasteful acts? There is absolutely no excuse, especially since the Spanish ad wizards are either too stupid, arrogant, or both to realise the implications of 'the internet' or the concept of a wider audience. And oh yeah, hey, news flash, notoriety is not always a good thing in the advertising world. Give me a break.

Posted by: South Ken on August 14, 2008 4:43 PM

I'm not offended, but I can see how people would be. When I saw the ad it pretty obvious this would become a major blow-up. There's a few guys who play in the NBA on that team. They should have known this wouldn't be kosher. You just can't take a cheap shot like that.

What about a bunch of guys in blackface? Or everyone looking like, as Jon Stewart says "Jewey McJewerton?"

What's funny is those two examples are stereotypes, and this ad isn't really stereotyping, is it? Quite a conundrum.

Posted by: pat smith on August 15, 2008 7:49 PM







Featured FREE Resource: