Campaigns Need Long Legs, Not Annual Amputations

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Writing on AdPulp and in his TalentZoo column, Dan Goldeier makes, correctly, the argument most campaigns are no longer given the time they need to build momentum and to enter the psyche of the consumer long enough to mean anything. He asks the question, "are ad campaigns given enough time to work these days?"

The answer is a resounding no and that, shortsightedly, been the case for a very long time. No one wants to, or is afraid to, invest the long periods of time it takes for a campaign to truly build. Everyone in marketing is too fickle and they are more concerned with advancing their own careers than advancing the success of the brands on which they work.

Dan is absolutely correct in his assessment that it's bullshit to assume the public tires of a campaign as quickly as marketers claim they do. That has nothing to do with it. The frenetic change is a result of those in the business who are out for themselves and concerned only with presenting the next new thing that will make them look cool in the eyes of the client or their superiors.

It takes years...YEARS for a campaign's message to sink in and all this crap about CMO's wanting to "make their mark" is destroying the entire purpose of advertising: to create a memorable brand that is identifiable and will sell product to those who identify with it. People don't change their habits overnight, if ever, in most case. They become comfortable and form buying habits with particular products and it takes more than a witty tagline to sway them into forming new habits.

It's almost as if we've all become a bunch of spoiled, whining brats who just want our way all the time despite what might be best for the greater good. And that's very, very wrong when it comes to creating a successful advertising campaign.

by Steve Hall    Sep- 4-08   Click to Comment   
Topic: Agencies, Brands, Campaigns, Opinion   

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Comments



Comments

This is a true observation but some brands do longevity very well - Absolut of course comes to mind and Apple as well as Diesel denim. The thing that we don't see often enough though is companies taking media buy risks to create the buzz from the grass roots level up. Campaigns come and go but good or bad the ones that last have created a foundation for their brand by starting small and viral and building fast and then repeating this process every few fiscal quarters. All the three brands mentioned above have gone that route but you can see it with many more. It's not just longevity. You can run the same campaign en-masse for years but if it hasn't resonated to actual consumers on a personal level it won't adhere. And as far as creatives just trying to push their careers - well duh - who isn't. I think it's a little more complicated than that though - human resource turn over, brand direction shift, economic dips and corporate buy-outs and take overs have just as much to do with the life-span of a brand message as anything else.

Posted by: Spyro Poulos on September 4, 2008 11:26 AM

This is a true observation but some brands do longevity very well - Absolut of course comes to mind and Apple as well as Diesel denim. The thing that we don't see often enough though is companies taking media buy risks to create the buzz from the grass roots level up. Campaigns come and go but good or bad the ones that last have created a foundation for their brand by starting small and viral and building fast and then repeating this process every few fiscal quarters. All the three brands mentioned above have gone that route but you can see it with many more. It's not just longevity. You can run the same campaign en-masse for years but if it hasn't resonated to actual consumers on a personal level it won't adhere. And as far as creatives just trying to push their careers - well duh - who isn't. I think it's a little more complicated than that though - human resource turn over, brand direction shift, economic dips and corporate buy-outs and take overs have just as much to do with the life-span of a brand message as anything else.

Posted by: Spyro Poulos on September 4, 2008 11:28 AM

Thanks for the kind words, Steve!

Posted by: Dan Goldgeier (aka Danny G) on September 4, 2008 12:04 PM

I agree with you. I think they are very valid points. However, I wouldn't be doing my job as a copywriter if I didn't point out the typo in the the last line of the article. It should be "our" not "tour." Anyway keep up the good work. I have been reading you for years.

Posted by: Keith on September 10, 2008 3:02 PM

I agree with you. I think they are very valid points. However, I wouldn't be doing my job as a copywriter if I didn't point out the typo in the the last line of the article. It should be "our" not "tour." Anyway keep up the good work. I have been reading you for years.

Posted by: Keith on September 10, 2008 3:03 PM







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