TubeMogul Creates 'Dating Site' for Marketers and Content Producers


TubeMogul recently announced the launch of a new "dating site" for content producers and potential advertisers. It's called TubeMogul Marketplace and from its start, I see its value both as a marketer and as an avid content consumer.

With an incredible amount of content on the Web, digital marketers tasked with identifying potential partnership opportunities can be quickly overwhelmed. TubeMogul's own video distribution service allows anyone with a video file and several online video accounts to plaster the Web with his/her content. The de facto decision often comes down to selecting between a few producers who are so well known that they naturally surface as contenders.

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by Amanda Mooney    Sep- 7-08    
Topic: Online, Social, Tools

Following Micro Status Updates Allows Brands to be "So Totally, Digitally Close" to Customers


In this week's Times Magazine, Clive Thompson (or @pomeranian99 on Twitter) described in his "I'm So Totally, Digitally Close to You" article how "incessant online contact" encouraged by tools like Facebook's Newsfeed and microblogging platforms like Twitter, has created "ambient awareness." Whether we tweet in 140 or less, post on each other's wall or upload photos, videos or Utterz, we're creating and curating a public record of who we are, what we like, dislike, what sparks our interests and what we care about.

This article left my head buzzing with the implications of this new "ambient awareness" and in particular, what it means for brands.

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by Amanda Mooney    Sep- 7-08    
Topic: Brands, Research, Social

AmEx Uses Member Successes to Ignite Future Ones


American Express has this program called Members Project, which funds worthy ventures with $2.5 million. (Members vote to decide who gets the money.) Read all about it.

To promote the program, AmEx used footage from previous ads to produce a montage of famous cardholders like John Cleese, Martin Scorsese, Robert DeNiro, Ellen Degeneres and Jim Henson.

Their achievements are presented as the fruit of childlike desires. Scorsese's "project," for example, was to "tell unforgettable stories"; Degeneres wanted to "encourage people to dance to their own tune." The premise is, these people changed the world with their passion. Got a dream? Maybe you can change it too.

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by Angela Natividad    Sep- 7-08    
Topic: Brands, Campaigns, Celebrity, Commercials, Television

Don't Just Be a Man; Be a Pretty Smart Shopper.


Dual body wash and moisturizer isn't really a new idea. (Companies like Dove beat that horse dead years ago.) Bringing bang to an old combo, Wieden + Kennedy enlist a centaur for Old Spice Double Impact. He's half man ... and half provider.

More importantly, he's actually got YouTube users talking about Old Spice. Will they buy the stuff? Hard to say. But hey, if a centaur doesn't turn this trick, Doogie Howser, M.D. definitely will.

by Angela Natividad    Sep- 7-08    
Topic: Best, Brands, Campaigns, Commercials, Online, Strange, Television

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Mrs. Butterworth Plays Wingman to Geico Customer


Think only experienced TV spokespeople wield influence? Yeah, Geico agrees. So to supplement the tale of an apparently ordinary customer, it ensured success with an old-school icon: Mrs. Butterworth. (You know, the maternal maple syrup bottle.)

I love how she tosses in that random "hot pancakes" reference. Good stuff by The Martin Agency.

by Angela Natividad    Sep- 7-08    
Topic: Brands, Campaigns, Commercials, Good, Trends and Culture

IBM Loosens Tie, Courts Granola-Chewing Tree Huggers


Commercials for IBM's "Go Green" campaign are all over my daytime TV. In the ones I've seen, corporate suits debate the merits of implementing energy-efficient policies. Once they opt to "go green" (usually for financial reasons), a cartoon forest -- complete with cheerful chirping wildlife and a high-pitched chorus -- blossoms around them. The message is that companies going green, whatever the reason, can change the environment for the better.

Style-wise, the effort mirrors a current Truth campaign where reality is also shattered by musical kitsch and doe-eyed cartoons. (Both are liable to make jaded cubicle cogs long for a vatful of hot smoking Dip.)

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by Angela Natividad    Sep- 7-08    
Topic: Brands, Campaigns, Commercials, Television

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