Walmart Gets Rapped With New Orleans Bounce

walmart_new_orleans_bounce.jpg

We're going to go out on a limb here to say Walmart had nothing whatsoever to do with the creation of this video in which New Orleans rapper Mr. Ghetto, accompanied by two booty shaking dancers, prattles on about the wonders of shopping at Walmart. All we can say is it's pretty fucking strange. But it will likely get Walmart more for their money than any recent marketing effort has.

With almost 56,000 views on YouTube in one day, the video is equally liked and disliked by viewers. Predictably, several comments center on race and the sad state of rap. Over at Walmart, we have to believe the marketing folks are either high fiving each other right now or shaking their heads in embarrassment they're associated with this dreadful oddity.

more »

by Steve Hall    May-18-11    
Topic: Creative Commentary, Opinion, Strange, Video



Rachel Bilson Sells Condoms...Uh...Ice Cream

rachel_bilson_magnum.jpg

Perhaps during the last week or so while fast forwarding through commercials, you may have caught a peek at the odd combination of Rachel Bilson and a box of condoms. You think to yourself, "condom ads on TV...no big deal. After all, TV is rife with penile stiffening products, why not condoms too?"

Had you paused and rewound to watch the commercial, you would have seen Bilson who, stuck in a traffic jam, decides to hop out of her car, run over the tops of other cars to chase an 18 wheeler filled with condoms.

Oh wait. Had you actually paid attention while watching the commercial you would have realized it wasn't a commercial for condoms at all. Rather it was Unilever's U.S. introduction of the very questionably (for this country) named Magnum ice cream.

more »

by Steve Hall    May-17-11    
Topic: Brands, Celebrity, Commercials, Creative Commentary, Opinion, Strange



Marketers Sell Boobs and Butts to Little Girls

tween_small.jpg

Writing on Strollerbaby, Rebecca Odes has an insightful take on the proliferation of brands selling products to young girls that are designed to make them look, well, less young. From padded bras to booty firming shoes, it would seem marketers are intent on turning 12 year olds into sexed up models.

Odes calls attention to a recent campaign from Skechers that promotes the brand's Shape Up sneakers for girls which, much like Reebok's ReTone sneakers, are designed to tone the thighs and butts of little girls.

And while Skechers says the campaign's message is "the same messaging as Michelle Obama's Get Moving campaign," Odes wonders why little boys don't need their thighs and butts toned as well.

We've written about this topic ad naseum wondering about the wisdom of marketers attempting to turn young girls into stripper-esque tweens and the industry's notion that using sex to sell is is a worthy business strategy.

What's the solution? It's simple. While sex and the use of it as a means of convincing someone to do something will never go away, marketers could very easily simply cease making sexualized products for children and stop glorifying and glamorizing a sexed up lifestyle to those under the age of 18.

more »

by Steve Hall    May-17-11    
Topic: Opinion



Cause Group Overreacts to Man Wearing Dress in Sprint Ad

sprint-antimerger-ad.png

In yet another sad confirmation the human race has lost its ability to appreciate humor, several cause groups have complained about a Sprint ad which ran several websites and newspapers Tuesday. The ad, which stated Sprint opposition to AT&T's proposed takeover of T-Mobile, features a man in a dress that looks like the one the T-Mobile Babe wears in the T-Mobile campaign.

A man in a dress! Now that's funny! Come on, people! But no. No one has a sense of humor anymore.

On complaint came from REC Networks Founder Michi Etre who is transgender and didn't like the ad. He issued a statement which read, in part, "We are deeply disturbed by an advertisement that was developed and approved in part by organizations including Media Access Project and the Center For Media Justice. While we do not view this as intentional transphobia on the part of MAP or the other organizations or Sprint, who purchased the advertising space, we feel that the depiction is still inappropriate."

Again. A man in a dress. What's next? Louisa May Alcott's Little Woman retitled because it offends midg...uh...little people?

by Steve Hall    May-12-11    
Topic: Brands, Cause, Opinion, Policy



#@%& Stupid People! And Diesel Jeans Too!

angry_aussie_diesel_jeans.jpg

The Angry Aussie, and man with many opinions about meany topics, has an opinion about the Diesel Jeans Be Stupid campaign. And it's far from a positive one. Check out his profanity-laden video in which he trashes anyone who has anything at all to do with Diesel Jeans. It's manufacturers. It's marketers. The people who wear them. And the people who think the campaign was on to something. Guess we're on his list.

more »

by Steve Hall    May-11-11    
Topic: Opinion, Video



Fans Follow Celebrities on Twitter No Matter What They Say

celebtwtiter.jpg

This guest article is written by David Murton who has been helping companies build and maintain their online relationships with customers since 2006. He is also a professional writer and blogger, with a particular interest in the open source Drupal platform. On a more personal note, David is an avid piano and accordion player, drawn especially to music of the classical and romantic periods.

Lo, it is written: the first shall be last, and the last shall be first. And, with celebrities now increasingly following their own followers on social media - the world's hippest new hit series - Matthew 20:16 has come to pass.

But Twitter 'twasn't always such. Back in the medium's early days - say, back when your current vehicle had about twenty thousand fewer miles - it was common for celebrities simply to treat social media merely as an extension of traditional media. That is, as just another billboard to plug their next film, book, or show, or to announce their latest political cause or adoption of a developing country's child.

more »

by Steve Hall    May- 4-11    
Topic: Opinion, Social



Is Budweiser Afraid of Gay Soldiers?

budweiser_coming_home.jpg

We'd like to know your thoughts on this one. A recent Budweiser ad centers on the story of a soldier returning home. In the ad, he first calls a friend and then his parents. When he finally gets home he is first hugged by his friend and then his family and other friends.

Some are calling this ad gay-themed. We say it is. We also say who gives a shit? Anyone, gay or straight, can shoot a gun and kill the enemy. But what we do give a shit about is the way Budweiser crafted this ad. Nebulous is a good word to describe the way the ad plays out.

more »

by Steve Hall    Apr-27-11    
Topic: Brands, Commercials, Opinion



Dos Equis Offers Advice to Men on Approaching Women

dos_equis_approach_women.jpg

As a man who might approach a woman in a social situation, would it behoove him to throw caution to the wind and scream out loud at her? That would seem to be the stance of those who are offended by a new Dos Equis ad which carries the headline, "Approach women like you do wild animals, With caution and a soothing voice."

Writing in AdWeek/AdFreak (it's kind of hard to tell the difference these days), David Gianatasio said the ad "not only offends women but adds an extra layer of insult by showing the world's least interesting Great White Colonial Man swaggering around in the brush with a pair of tribesmen at his side."

We beg to differ, David. A healthy dose of caution and soothing suavity is always advised when approaching women. After all, men certainly don't want to risk getting their head bitten off, a suffering which, sadly, is perpetrated upon men by women far too often.

Better safe than sorry. Always good advice in our book when it comes to interacting with the opposite sex.

by Steve Hall    Apr-25-11    
Topic: Brands, Creative Commentary, Opinion, Strange



Big Breasts Do Not Belong in Your Portfolio

Portfolio4.jpg

Writing on About.com, Paul Sugget has published an article entitled What to Avoid When Assembling a Portfolio. His primary piece of advice is to avoid going for the simple, the obvious, the easy. If you've ever done work for the likes of Nike, Viagra, Victoria's Secret, Red Bull or Wonderbra, leave that work out of your portfolio. Why? Because, in his opinion, it doesn't require much strategy or effort to come up with creative solutions for those categories.

He claims Wonderbra ads are a dime a dozen writing, "Big breasts, and the outcome of them, is a very simple idea to get behind, and it's easy to be visually funny and verbally concise." Instead, he argues, "do ads for bland products or services that have no easily-identifiable or unique traits."

He suggests an airlines, dish soap, a wireless carrier and we'd toss in anything from the business to business category.

Additionally, he urges creatives to avoid creative that looks expensive to produce as it could cause someone to think you can't work on a small budget. he says to make sue you don't stuff your portfolio exclusively with popular forms of media, make sure substantive ideas outweigh glossy polish, don't include anything your not 100 percent proud of and always finish strong.

by Steve Hall    Apr- 7-11    
Topic: Opinion, Tools



'Tone It Down' Mentality The Death Knell of Ad Agencies

captains_of_industry_tone_it_down.jpg

This is a conundrum we've heard millions of times before. A client comes to an agency and asks for "breakthrough" creative. Creative goes off and conceptualizes brilliance. It gets presented internally and everyone loves it. But just before it's ready to be presented to the client, someone, usually in account management (let's be honest here), says, "I like it personally, but somebody might be offended. Just tone it down."

And therein lies one of the biggest problems of the ad agency business. Agencies are asked and are in business to create marketing programs that, to use an overused phrase, cut through the clutter more than their competition can cut through the clutter. Sadly, many agencies are more conservative when it comes to risk taking than and health insurance actuarial agent. Which is to say, there is no risk taking at all.

more »

by Steve Hall    Apr- 6-11    
Topic: Agencies, Opinion, Video








Stanton Optical


Featured FREE Resource: