Come On Now, Even Wales Got Schooled in Existentialism

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Here's an ad for Brecon Five vodka that got people's panties in a twist because it plays on the stereotype that Welsh people are stupid. (We never heard that, but we did hear they were cannibals.)

Brecon Five is a label under the Welsh Whisky Company. It's not the only vodka ever to poke fun at its heritage to make itself look better.

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by Angela Natividad    Dec-13-07    
Topic: Brands, Campaigns, Commercials, Policy, Trends and Culture



That Old Idea That There Are No New Ideas Is No Official

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We've thought this at the end of every year for a long time but now it's ben made official. It seems 2007 has been dubbed The Year We Finally Ran Out of Ideas and that sentiment has taken on the for of a cartoonish re-cap of the year in which sequel-itis, Orville resurrection, the Dentsu scandal and Sony's rabbits are given their proper spot in the compendium of the year's work.

by Steve Hall    Dec-10-07    
Topic: Creative Commentary, Good, Trends and Culture



Omnicom Touts Cutting Edge Capabilities...With 2006 Work

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This is the perfect time to use George Parker's BDA acronym which stands for Big Dumb Agencies. Adrants reader Lauren tipped us to a story in AdWeek about Omnicom's John Wren touting the holding company's "non-traditional" work.

The story miffed here a bit and she wrote us, "Congratulations Omnicom and welcome to the digital age. This article really bothered me because it seems like the advertising trades are so obsessed with covering any bit of news coming out of holding companies that they are missing the real news, the real trends and maybe even the cool interactive work that's being done now, and not in 2006. And (gasp) maybe, just maybe it's not the holding companies that are ahead of the game this time..."

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by Steve Hall    Dec- 6-07    
Topic: Agencies, Opinion, Trends and Culture



To Find New Flavor, the Dew Launches Dystopian Virtual World

Crowdsourcing meets sci-fi meets a quasi-virtual world in Mountain Dew's exploding head-inducing campaign, DEWmocracy.

Supported by traditional advertising, DEWmocracy paints a dismal future filled with corporate suits that travel in the backs of pick-up trucks, and where high fructose corn syrup is considered a magical elixir capable of overthrowing big brother.

Through the site, the Dew ultimately aims to put consumers on an adventure to come up with its newest flavor and packaging, while grabbing as much marketing data on its brave virtual freedom fighters.

Fresh with ideas from his performance in Battlefield Earth, Forest Whitaker helped entertainment concept firm Protagonist in creating this brave dew world.

by Albert Kugel    Dec- 5-07    




Folksonomy Socially Graphs the Ajaxed Web 2.0 Bubble

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If you don't think we're in a bubble reminiscent of 1999-2001, take a look at this video. It's amazing what a bit of time crunched historical retrospective will do to one's perspective on that topic. It's pretty amazing what's happened in the last two to three years. This video captures it and more. Give it a look and then let us now whether or not you think we're in a bubble and if you think it's about to pop. Comment here or over on AdGabber where the video is hosted.

Be sure to check out the similarly styled video on the last two years worth of viral videos.

by Steve Hall    Dec- 5-07    
Topic: Trends and Culture, Video



Washington Monument Sports A Condom. Just Wait. It'll Happen

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Just when you think every last bit of space has been commandeered by ads, another pops up. We know someday someone's going to offer to paint our house for free in exchange for placing a giant logo on the front of our house. And Kevin Dugan, in an article on his blog posits we may soon see the Washington Monument sheathed in a Durex condom, ads embedded in one's bodies so they appear on x-rays, ads painted in the bowl of a toilet (this one's a no brainer), ads on baby scales and ads on headstones in graveyards.

Think it won't happen? Did you ever think you'd see ads on the paper that covers the exam table in a doctor's office or on the front of snow plows?

by Steve Hall    Dec- 4-07    
Topic: Guerilla, Strange, Trends and Culture



Cyber Monday Traffic Increases 26 Percent, Says Hitwise

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We're a little late to the chase on this one, but we thought it was worth mentioning that Cyber Monday traffic increased 26 percent this year. The top 100 retail websites received about 5.07 percent of all US visits, and expectedly, Amazon topped the retail charts.

That means either fewer people have qualms about online shopping, or more people are getting lazier about leaving home. (We actually went out on Black Friday, and the workout in patience and marathon running we got is no joke.)

by Angela Natividad    Dec- 3-07    
Topic: Online, Trends and Culture



Media Kills. So Why Not Light Up Instead?

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Tell Reynolds they don't need to pull their print ads after all. A team at the University of Michigan waded through 50 years of research and concluded media violence is as hazardous as smoking.

Violent video games and television shows were targeted, with children more heavily influenced by what they see than adults, although women and men are equally likely to engage in violence they've seen in the media.

Well, hey. After our WoW sessions we've just got to grab a scimitar and kick some burly guy's ass. And don't even get us started on Heroes.

by Angela Natividad    Nov-29-07    
Topic: Bad, Research, Strange, Trends and Culture



Consumers Still Bombarded With Advertising, Ad Model Still Broken

Please, We've Seen It All

The average consumer can't go through a day without seeing 3,500 commercial messages. That's a hell of a lot of clutter for one individual to sift through but that's the reality of today's advertising marketplace. From guerrilla marketing to all forms of "street furniture" advertising to human sandwich boards, advertising is inescapable unless one were to move to the Moon. Even there, one could probably see the screaming lights of Times Square when Jenna Jameson yelled, "Visit my website! Buy my videos!"

With media fragmentation comes advertiser's use of that fragmentation in the increasingly difficult war waged to win the valuable consumer eyeball. This fragmentation has given way to more unique forms of advertising that fall into the guerrilla marketing space but even these efforts are getting tired. Once novel, tactics such as forehead advertising, invertising, advergaming, dogvertising, adverblogging, blogvertising, bloodvertising and bravertising are now old hat. Other methods such as school bus, in-school and police car advertising are considered only out of financial desperation. Layer on top of that more recent whacked social media efforts like PayPerPost and clearly, the model is hurting.

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by Steve Hall    Nov-27-07    
Topic: Opinion, Trends and Culture



Facebook, Facebook, Facebook!

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We can't wait until Facebook, web two-dot-oh's Marsha Brady, gets dropped by fawning advertisers like a bad habit. In the meantime, here's the story on a new Digg-style feature they added to the Stalker Feed while we were all gorging ourselves for a tryptophan high.

Freezing Hot also posted statistics on Facebook's users. Age, edu level, gender and political affiliation are also thoughtfully graphed. Big users are mostly liberal, mostly college-educated and mostly women. The majority is also single and between ages 18 and 24.

We can almost hear the chops-licking in the 'netosphere. Guess Marsha won't be going out of style anytime soon.

by Angela Natividad    Nov-26-07    
Topic: Online, Research, Trends and Culture










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