Firm to Measure Blog-Based TV Buzz

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Eluded to at a recent ad:tech conference in New York, Word of mouth research and planning firm BuzzMetrics has launched a syndicated service to measure television discussion on blogs, message boards and other social media. Called TV*BuzzMetrics, the ratings service will provide television executives and advertisers "ongoing qualitative insights that help explain key drivers of viewer engagement, and understand potential value of new programs." Making this all possible, BuzzMetrics is a business affiliate of VNU, owner of research brands ACNielsen and Nielsen Media Research.

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by Steve Hall    Dec- 1-05    
Topic: Research, Television, Tools, Weblogs



Generation Y Ripe For Experiential Marketing

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A recent survey of 2,574 US consumers commissioned by Jack Morton and conducted this year found Gen Y consumers - also known as "millennials" - respond strongly to live marketing events, which they prefer over TV and Internet advertising. While self serving, the study found 70 percent of 13 to 23 year olds say experiential marketing is extremely or very influential on their opinion of a product or brand. Sixty Five percent of 13 to 23 year olds say participating in an event would cause them to act more quickly to purchase a product. Seventy six percent of this demographic say participating in an event would make them more receptive to the brand or product's advertising. Seventy four percent of 13 to 23 year olds say participating in a live marketing experience is something they would tell others about.

Whether or not Jack Morton is drumming up business for it self with this study is irrelevant. What's very relevant is the fact Gen Y, and other demos for that matter, don't respond well anymore to traditional media. The emerging field of experiential marketing - a fancy name for event marketing - appears to be gaining traction and success at reaching elusive, traditional media-averse audiences.

by Steve Hall    Nov-30-05    
Topic: Agencies, Research, Trends and Culture



New Email Marketing Guide is Da Bomb

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Newly researched, MarketingSherpa's Email Marketing Benchmark Guide 2006 is out and includes 310 charts, tables, and heatmaps featuring data on open rates, clickthrough rates, email budgeting, typical conversion rates, business-to-business email marketing, and ecommerce email campaigns. Seven eyetracking heatmaps are also included which reveal the results of eyetracking lab tests conducted by MarketingSherpa to determine how the human eye interacts with email, including text versus HTML formats.

For you email marketers, this is the bomb. Oops, we can't say that because we're only , so we'll just say, "You gotta get this report, homies!" Oh wait, that's not right either. Let's try, "This report kicks ass!" Hmm...too blunt too eighties. How about, "Get this report and you'll be counting clicks all the way to the bank." Nope. Way too cheesy. Well, perhaps we'll just say, "If your marketing department sends out email newsletters and/or sales alerts, the new MarketingSherpa Email Marketing Benchmark Guide 2006 is a practical must-read." There. That's it. When in doubt, just copy what the press release says.

by Steve Hall    Nov-16-05    
Topic: Research



PR Firm Lures Survey Respondents with Striptease

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While it's quite common for marketers to offer incentives to insure completion of a survey, the Hungarian office of PR firm Sawyer Miller has swept aside those less than motivating one dollar bill, Amazon coupon and free iTunes download offers for what really matters: a stripping hottie. Answer a question, off comes a piece of clothing. Get an answer wrong, no matter. Just keep clicking until you get the right answer and...off comes a piece of clothing. Of course, it's less of a survey and more of a presentation as there's only one correct answer to each question. Not that it matters but it has something to do with Hungarian economics. Have fun but turn the volume down if you're at work lest you want co-workers to think there's a lunchtime quickie rockin' your cube. Thanks, Rick.

by Steve Hall    Nov-15-05    
Topic: Online, Research



Gaming Medium Growing in Pervasiveness, Not Fully Tapped

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By now, it's widely known gaming, although far from fully tapped by marketers, is fast becoming a killer marketing app. More and more studies point to the medium pervasiveness among all age groups.

According to a soon to be released study of 4,000 adults and 1,000 teens conducted online for Jack Myers Media Business Report, 62 percent of all males and 47 percent of all females played video games either on consoles or online in the past week. Males spent an average of one hour and six minutes daily and females 42 minutes daily. Eighty percent of males 18-24 played video games in the past week as did 55 percent of females 18-24.

Among teens, 71.5 percent of all males and 47.7 percent of all females played video games either on consoles or online in the past week. Males spent an average of one hour and 54 minutes daily and females an average of 36 minutes daily.

by Steve Hall    Nov-15-05    
Topic: Games, Research



List Size Affects Best Email Day

A recent eROI study which examined open and click rates of mailing lists of all sizes across all the days of the week found, on average, Sunday was the best day with an open rate of 30.8 percent and a click rate of 7.2 percent. Before all marketers rush out and clog up everyone's lazy Sunday afternoon with e-trash, the study also indicated that the best day to mail varies with list size. The bigger the list, the less efficient. Lists over 200,000 do well on Saturday. Micro mailers (extremely small) do best on weekends. Small mailers do best on Friday. Mid-sized lists do best on Monday and Friday.

by Steve Hall    Nov-11-05    
Topic: Online, Research



Nielsen Measures Minutes, Scraps Commercial Measurement

We don't profess to have a clue how the inner working of the Nielsen measurement conglomerate works but common sense tell us if they can measure a minute, they can certainly measure 30 seconds. Answering the industries call to measure what matters, the commercials rather than the programs in which they air, Nielsen has announced new minute by minute ratings but has also scrapped plans to measure smaller chunks of time in which most commercial actually air. The new system will allow for matching a measured minute to the time an ad ran but why not simply measure the actual ads? Oh, because most suck, no one watches them and it will quickly become apparent that placing a :30 on TV is no longer a wise decision thereby causing a dramatic drop in television revenue, part of which goes to pay the hefty sums Nielsen charges for its measurement services. Sort of a catch-22 situation.

This old system of measurement really should be dumped and replaced with a system like Ad ID and other "marker" technology used by viral marketers to track viewership of viral video. The thing gets viewed, it gets counted. It doesn't get viewed, it doesn't get counted. That doesn't happen with Nielsen. And yea, yea, there's the whole thing about matching viewership to demographics but hey, we just write about this stuff. We don't profess to be able to figure it out.

by Steve Hall    Nov- 4-05    
Topic: Research



Ad Age's 'Read Blogs At Work' Survey Self-Serving

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Joe Jaffe comments that this week's Ad Age poll, which is a follow on to a study they did about blog readership at work, which asks whether employers should allow staff to read blogs at work is self-serving. I agree and commented that the whole distinction between blogs and mainstream media is overblown, "Exactly, Joe. What's the difference between reading a blog on a topic for a specific industry versus a 'regular' website for a specific industry? It makes no sense. If blogs are doing a good job of providing industry specific info, then they should be read. If mainstream media site are doing the same, then they should be read as well. If people like to read Page Six, then it should be OK to read Gawker too. There's far too much distinction being made here. Granted, there are huge differences between MSM and blogs but, in the end, they are both providing content. It should be up to the reader to decide whether MSM or blogs are doing a better job providing relevant info."

Oh and if this doen't wreak of self-promo:

"Thank you for your interest in AdAge.com's poll. The poll about blog reading at work is now closed. Watch for the results in next week's print edition of Advertising Age." WTF? The results of an online poll reported in the print edition? A week later? You must be joking. Scott, what are you guys smoking over there? Oh, we get it. You need more print subscribers. Now it all makes sense.

by Steve Hall    Nov- 3-05    
Topic: Research, Weblogs



Calvin Klein's One Day Time's Square Billboard Worked

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So that we aren't accused of simply highlighting odd advertising stunts without giving credence to their success or failure, we point you to a MarketingSherpa study that examined Calvin Klein's one day "live" billboard in which male and females Calvin Klein models hang out in a board constructed to look like a living room. Usually these things are tossed off as stunts purely to garner media attention which, though not a bad thing, doesn't always translate into sales. This time it did. Times three, in fact. The promotion, along with achieving media coverage in 15 countries, 100,000 visitors to the campaign's microsite and 20,000 street team sample packs gone by mid-day and another 20,000 but day's end, netted three times normal sales for CK One at the nearby Macy's Herald Square location.

by Steve Hall    Nov- 2-05    
Topic: Brands, Outdoor, Research



Citizen's Media Measurement System Needed

Jeff Jarvis, as he has done before, is calling for system of measure for citizens media that would properly reflect the nature of this consumer-generated media space. Because many media outlets in this space are simply too small to be counted with the ill-fitting mass media metrics does not mean the outlets are not important to advertisers. Jeff has approached Burst Media's Jarvis Coffin to set up a trade group to represent this new form of media and suggest metrics consist of a combination of values such as authority, influence, ability to start conversations, relationship with readers and reader loyalty and engagement with the media outlet. He suggests, among other sources, data from blog measurement firms such as BlogPulse, Technorati and Icerocket be combined, or "munged" as he says, into a data source that would properly reflect the weblog and make it easy for an advertiser to substantiate spending any ad dollars on the blog.

by Steve Hall    Oct-27-05    
Topic: Research, Weblogs










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